Category Archives: Most Popular

Weekly Wrap Volume 114

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. A COPS Story COPS has been a Saturday night TV staple for so long—29 seasons—that it’s easy to forget what a groundbreaking show it was when it debuted in 1989. FIRST-PERSON PERSPECTIVE In the early 1980s, an aspiring filmmaker named John Langley […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 113

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. The U.S. Military’s Proposed “Gay” Bomb One doesn’t commonly associate the slogan “make love not war” with the U.S. military. Indeed, the United States military is feared and formidable precisely because it has proven so effective at conceptualizing clever and innovative […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 112

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. How Dick Came to Be Short for Richard The name Richard is thought by most etymologists to derive from the Proto-Germanic ‘Rikharthu’, meaning more or less “hard ruler” (‘Rik-‘ meaning ‘ruler’ and ‘-harthu’ meaning ‘hard’).  This was adopted into Old High […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 111

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. The Strange Story of the First Olympian Disqualified for Doping Olympians have been bending (and occasionally breaking) the rules in an effort to give themselves an edge over the competition since the games began. Despite this, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 110

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. What Does the Dangly Thing in the Back of Your Throat Do Hanging from the back edge of your soft palate, the palatine uvula seems to serve several functions, none of which are particularly necessary for most people, which is why […]

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Fascinating Olympics Facts

Here’s a round-up of all the interesting Olympic facts we’ve covered over the years, including eighteen articles and seven Quick Olympics Facts. Why Do Olympians Wear Colored Tape? The colored tape the Olympians and other athletes wear is called “Kinesio® Tex Tape”, which is essentially just an elastic cotton strip with an acrylic, heat activated adhesive.  The tape was designed […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume Volume 109

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. The Husband and Wife Team That Gave the World the First Car, and the Road Trip That Saved it From Obscurity We may not have flying cars quite yet, but the ground-bound automobile is the world’s second most popular mode of […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 108

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. The Dentist Who Helped Make Cotton Candy a Thing While candy floss / cotton candy-like spun-sugar confectioneries have been around since at least the 15th century, if not earlier, it’s only been recently that cotton candy has been something practical to […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 107

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. What Are Sea-Monkeys? The product of a collaboration between a marketer and inventor and a marine biologist, Sea-Monkeys are a hybrid of several species of brine shrimp (Artemia), bred to have a particularly long dormant period, as well as to foster […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 106

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. The Declaration of Independence Was Approved on July 2nd And Signed on August 2nd, So Why Is July 4th Independence Day? While it is often said that the Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776, this isn’t actually correct. […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 105

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. When Rubber Duckies Started Making Bath Time Lots of Fun In 1970, everyone’s favorite orange roommate sang a song to his bathtime buddy. “Oh, rubber duckie, you’re the one. You make bathtime lots of fun,” cooed Ernie to his squeaky yellow […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 104

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. Why Are You Not Supposed to Use Twice Boiled Water for Tea There’s a rather persistent idea that “reboiling” water (i.e. boiling water two or more times and allowing it to cool in-between) while making a cup of tea is potentially […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 103

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. THE SURPRISINGLY RECENT TIME TESTS USING RABBITS AND FROGS WERE THE GOLD STANDARD TO ACCURATELY DETECT HUMAN PREGNANCY We live in an age where determining if a woman is pregnant is ridiculously simple and cheap. Go back a few decades, though, […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 100

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. Why are People So Much Taller Today Than Historically? Over the last century and a half or so, humans, as a group, have grown significantly taller, with men from western, industrialized countries today being on average between 3 and 7 inches […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 99

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. Dustbin of History: The Other Network You may not remember when TV was black and white. You may not remember when there were no remotes and you had to get up to change channels or adjust the volume. Even if you […]

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Weekly Wrap Volume 98

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. When Did People Start Using Punctuation? The earliest writings, which were syllabic and/or logographic (think Mayan and Chinese), had no need for either spacing or punctuation, as each word was typically self-contained in the symbol. However, as previously demonstrated, the lack […]

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