History »

The Truth About the Origin of Floating Soap

The Truth About the Origin of Floating Soap

Karl Smallwood March 26, 2015 0

Ivory has been producing their uniquely floating soap for the well over a century now and in that time they’ve become one of the most popular soap brands in the world. For many years,

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Operation Upshot-Knothole, Atomic Annie and the Irradiating of America

Operation Upshot-Knothole, Atomic Annie and the Irradiating of America

Melissa March 17, 2015 0

From the first Trinity test in Alamogordo, New Mexico on July 16, 1945 until a unilateral moratorium was declared on October 2, 1992, the United States conducted hundreds of nuclear tests around the globe

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Why the Week Starts on Sunday

Why the Week Starts on Sunday

Melissa March 11, 2015 10

Karla S. asks: Why does the week start on Sunday? Why not Wednesday or Friday? As with so many things passed down to us from antiquity, religion is the reason the calendar week starts

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Did the Battle of Gettysburg Really Begin as a Search for Shoes?

Did the Battle of Gettysburg Really Begin as a Search for Shoes?

Melissa March 9, 2015 1

Romi asks: They said on a documentary on Netflix I watched that the battle of Gettysburgh started as a fight over shoes. Is this true? Marking the Confederacy’s last stab at a major offensive

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The Vela Incident

The Vela Incident

Melissa February 27, 2015 2

As the 1970s were drawing to a close, the global political situation was uncertain. Peace in the Middle East was imminent for some, while others in the region were witnessing dramatic revolution; at the

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That Time Pre-Sliced Bread was Banned in the United States

That Time Pre-Sliced Bread was Banned in the United States

Daven Hiskey February 24, 2015 0

In 1943, Claude R. Wickard, the head of the War Foods Administration as well as the Secretary of Agriculture, got the bright idea to ban pre-sliced bread in America, which he did on January

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The Victorian Moustache Cup

The Victorian Moustache Cup

Karl Smallwood February 19, 2015 1

Beyond being a staple of any self-respecting peace officer, thanks to the popularity of things like Movember, the humble moustache has made a glorious, bristly return to the faces of men all over the

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Why Do Drawn Hearts Look Nothing Like Real Hearts?

Why Do Drawn Hearts Look Nothing Like Real Hearts?

Karl Smallwood February 13, 2015 1

Mark R. asks: Why do drawn hearts look nothing like real hearts? Who first drew them this way? The heart symbol is one of the single most enduring and widely recognised symbols in modern

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That Time an Argument Over the Quality of Ale Resulted in a Battle Between Oxford Students and the Townsfolk

That Time an Argument Over the Quality of Ale Resulted in a Battle Between Oxford Students and the Townsfolk

Karl Smallwood February 11, 2015 1

Oxford University is well known for being one of the most prestigious and elite places of learning in history. Over the years, it has seen some of the finest minds the world has ever

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A Lesson in Failure- The Rise of the Mars Candy Company

A Lesson in Failure- The Rise of the Mars Candy Company

Matt Blitz February 10, 2015 5

The legendary Roald Dahl’s book Charlie & Chocolate Factory from 1964 (and its subsequent two film adaptations from 1971 and 2005) told the story of a magical candy factory and its eccentric and mysterious

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The Invention of the Cardboard Box

The Invention of the Cardboard Box

Matt Blitz February 9, 2015 11

Gared O. asks: Who invented the cardboard box? The cardboard box goes largely unappreciated. Yet, it is indispensable to our daily living. It holds all of our knick-knacks and personal mementos when we move

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Why Do Judges Wear Robes?

Why Do Judges Wear Robes?

Sarah Stone February 6, 2015 1

Juana R. asks: Why do judges wear robes? Is this still a requirement or just a tradition? Most of us in the western world expect judges to wear a robe when they sit behind

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The Origin of Valentine’s Day

The Origin of Valentine’s Day

Matt Blitz February 5, 2015 5

While not thought to be directly related to modern Valentine’s Day traditions, the beginnings of celebrating love (of a sort) in February date back to the Romans. The feast of Lupercalia was a pagan

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A Space Race for the Dogs… and Monkeys and Fruit Flies

A Space Race for the Dogs… and Monkeys and Fruit Flies

Matt Blitz February 4, 2015 2

The first Earthlings sent into space were brave, calm under pressure, and heroic. They were also not human and many of them were furry. Yes, before Apollo 13, Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, and Yuri

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The Invention of the Pencil Sharpener

The Invention of the Pencil Sharpener

Matt Blitz January 28, 2015 2

For years, the knife was the most commonly used tool to sharpen the wooden writing instrument known as a pencil (which historians believe was invented in the 15th or 16th century). But whittling the

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The Invention of the Piano

The Invention of the Piano

Sarah Stone January 26, 2015 1

The names that come to mind at the mention of the Italian Renaissance are the likes of Medici, Da Vinci, and Galileo. Few, however, know the name Bartolomeo Cristofori, an accomplished craftsman who lived

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The Teenager Who was Executed Twice

The Teenager Who was Executed Twice

Daven Hiskey January 19, 2015 0

Today I found out about a 16 year old sentenced to death who had to have that sentence carried out twice. The teenager was Willie Francis, the youngest of 13 children in a poor

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The Rubber Band: Holding It Together Since 1820

The Rubber Band: Holding It Together Since 1820

Matt Blitz January 19, 2015 2

Matthew L. asks: Who invented the rubber band? Cheap, reliable, and strong, the rubber band is one of the world’s most ubiquitous products. It holds papers together, prevents long hair from falling in a

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