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Frogs and Milk- How to Keep Milk from Spoiling Without Refrigeration

Frogs and Milk- How to Keep Milk from Spoiling Without Refrigeration

Matt Blitz April 24, 2014 0

For centuries, before refrigeration, an old Russian practice was to drop a frog into a bucket of milk to keep the milk from spoiling. In modern times, many believed that this was nothing more

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Was Colonel Sanders Actually a Colonel?

Was Colonel Sanders Actually a Colonel?

Matt Blitz April 21, 2014 3

Rachel M. asks: Was Colonel Sanders really a Colonel? Kentucky Colonel is the highest honor that can be bestowed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. (Incidentally, if you’re curious: Why Colonel is Pronounced “Kernel”) To

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A Brief History of Beer

A Brief History of Beer

Kathy Padden April 18, 2014 5

Beer brewing and drinking are activities that have been part of the human experience seemingly since the dawn of civilization. Around 10,000 years ago, mankind began to move away from living life as nomadic

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Why the Insides of Apples Turn Brown When Exposed to Air

Why the Insides of Apples Turn Brown When Exposed to Air

Daven Hiskey April 15, 2014 3

Goro T asks: Why do the insides of apples turn brown when you cut the apple open? The insides of apples turn brown when exposed to air thanks to a built in defense mechanism

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Why Are Vitamins Labeled A, B (and all the sub B’s), C, Etc.?

Why Are Vitamins Labeled A, B (and all the sub B’s), C, Etc.?

Melissa April 1, 2014 0

John asks: Why are vitamins named via the alphabet? Easily identifiable by simple terms, the vitamins we recognize today were only recently isolated, identified and named. Roots of Vitamins Scientists studying why animals failed

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The History of Burritos

The History of Burritos

Emily Upton April 1, 2014 0

Burritos are one of the most popular Tex-Mex items on the menu. Anyone who knows a little Spanish has probably raised their eyebrows at the name, however. In Spanish, a “burro” is a donkey,

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Why Cashews are Not Sold to Consumers in Their Shells and Why Pistachios Used to Be Dyed Red

Why Cashews are Not Sold to Consumers in Their Shells and Why Pistachios Used to Be Dyed Red

Daven Hiskey March 24, 2014 5

Why Cashews are Not Sold to Consumers in Their Shells Cashews are a member of the same family as poison ivy, Anacardiaceae. Like poison ivy and many other members of the family, part of

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What is Gluten?

What is Gluten?

Matt Blitz March 19, 2014 0

Amanda asks: What is gluten and why is it bad for you? These days, just casually strolling down a grocery aisle, one can find a multitude of gluten-free products. From gluten-free whole grain bread

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Why One Bad Apple Spoils a Bunch

Why One Bad Apple Spoils a Bunch

Daven Hiskey March 6, 2014 0

This isn’t just a popular metaphor, it’s actually true. One bad apple will absolutely quickly spoil an entire box of apples. The obvious way this can happen is simply if one of the apples

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The Surprisingly Short History of the Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich

The Surprisingly Short History of the Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich

Emily Upton February 25, 2014 0

The peanut butter and jelly sandwich is such a staple of American childhood these days that it seems like it’s been around, well, forever. In fact, it took a surprisingly long time after all

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The Difference Between Brown and White Eggs

The Difference Between Brown and White Eggs

Emily Upton February 17, 2014 7

Harriet W. asks: What is the difference between brown and white eggs? There are all sorts of rumours surrounding brown eggs and white eggs. Some people say that brown eggs are better for you

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A Brief History of the Apple Tree

A Brief History of the Apple Tree

Melissa February 11, 2014 0

An integral part of the American experience, “As American as Apple Pie” (which in truth is not American), the apple is nevertheless ubiquitous in U.S. culture. We put it in desserts, give it to

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What Exactly is Malt?

What Exactly is Malt?

Melissa February 5, 2014 3

Ryan asks: What exactly is malt? For millions of drinkers, it is perhaps the most important ingredient in the world. Malt, Exactly  Malt is the product that is left over after a cereal grain

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Why Is Ketchup Red and Mustard Yellow?

Why Is Ketchup Red and Mustard Yellow?

Melissa January 28, 2014 3

Jason asks: Why is ketchup red and mustard yellow? Although in other food traditions, ketchup and mustard may be different colors, in classic American cuisine, ketchup is red and mustard is yellow. Here’s why:

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The World’s Most Expensive Cup of Coffee

The World’s Most Expensive Cup of Coffee

Matt Blitz January 27, 2014 6

According to a 2013 survey, over eighty three percent of Americans drink coffee in the morning and the average citizen drinks multiple cups per day. Between the dark brew, the flavored lattes, the frozen

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The Jiggly History of Jell-O

The Jiggly History of Jell-O

Matt Blitz January 24, 2014 7

Daniel asks: Who invented Jell-O? For over a century, Jell-O has been a part of American culture and, according to a 1904 edition of the Ladies Home Journal, “America’s Favorite Dessert” (conveniently enough named

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A Brief History of Pepper

A Brief History of Pepper

Melissa January 21, 2014 2

The world’s most commonly used spice, Piper nigrum, starts life as berries in a clump on a flowering vine (like grapes). Native to Southern India, today pepper is grown throughout the tropics. Archaeological evidence

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The Fascinating Early History of Salt

The Fascinating Early History of Salt

Melissa January 13, 2014 1

There are a lot of different salts (like potassium nitrate for gunpowder and sodium bicarbonate for baking) but only one that truly meets our dietary needs and satisfies our craving for that salty taste

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