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The Richest Family in the World

The Richest Family in the World

Matt Blitz January 15, 2015 0

Who was the wealthiest person in every century? That was a question we tried to answer in a previous TIFO article. While it was an incredibly difficult question to get definitive answers to, it

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The Man Who Sold the Eiffel Tower

The Man Who Sold the Eiffel Tower

Matt Blitz January 14, 2015 1

It was in May of 1925 when Victor Lustig first conceived the scheme that would make him a legend. With documents and letterheads proclaiming him the Deputy Director of the Ministere de Postes et

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Why is it Called Area 51?

Why is it Called Area 51?

Melissa January 13, 2015 7

Michael S. asks: Why is it called Area “51”? Where are the other 50 areas? Despite the CIA’s release of previously classified documents in 2013 that acknowledged the existence of Area 51 as a

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The Origin of the Oreo Cookie

The Origin of the Oreo Cookie

Matt Blitz January 12, 2015 7

Harry K. asks: Who invented the Oreo cookie? In 1890, a group of eight large New York City bakeries combined to form the New York Biscuit Company and built a giant six-story factory in

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Weekly Wrap Volume 70

Weekly Wrap Volume 70

Daven Hiskey January 10, 2015 0

This is a weekly wrap of our popular Daily Knowledge Newsletter. You can get that newsletter for free here. Why Children Get Summers Off of School The commonly touted explanation for students having summers

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The Tragic Life of JFK’s Sister

The Tragic Life of JFK’s Sister

Matt Blitz January 9, 2015 4

On January 20, 1961, the newly-elected President John F. Kennedy,  at his inauguration in front of the Capital, told Americans to “ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can

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How Soap Works

How Soap Works

Melissa January 8, 2015 9

Janet B. asks: How does soap kill bacteria? For well over a century, public health officials have been pushing regular hand washing with soap as one of the most effective methods of inhibiting the

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The Forgotten Hero: Larry Doby

The Forgotten Hero: Larry Doby

Matt Blitz January 7, 2015 0

On April 15, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York, the great Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier and became the first African-American in 67 years to play in the Major Leagues. (Yes, Robinson was not

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Why Children Get Summers Off of School

Why Children Get Summers Off of School

Sarah Stone January 5, 2015 1

Xing U. asks: Why do kids get the summer off of school? The commonly touted explanation for students having summers off from school dates back to a time when the United States’ economy relied

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What Does the “D” in “D-Day” Stand For?

What Does the “D” in “D-Day” Stand For?

Sarah Stone January 2, 2015 1

Tom C. asks: The V in V-Day was for Victory right? So what does the D in D-Day stand for? The Battle of Normandy, also known as D-Day, started on June 6, 1944 and

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Podcast Episode #309: The Bermuda Triangle

Podcast Episode #309: The Bermuda Triangle

Simon Whistler January 1, 2015 1

In this episode, you’re going to learn whether there is any truth to the notion that the Bermuda Triangle is a ship and plane graveyard. [TRANSCRIPT] Don’t miss future episodes of this podcast, subscribe

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Who Invented the Fahrenheit and Celsius Temperature Scales and What Zero Degrees Fahrenheit Signifies

Who Invented the Fahrenheit and Celsius Temperature Scales and What Zero Degrees Fahrenheit Signifies

Melissa December 31, 2014 2

B. Halpern asks: 0 degrees Celsius is the freezing point of water. So what is 0 degrees Fahrenheit? Who came up with Celsius and Fahrenheit? Firmly entrenched in American society, the seemingly capricious nature

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Podcast Episode #307: Auld Lang Syne

Podcast Episode #307: Auld Lang Syne

Simon Whistler December 30, 2014 0

In this episode, you’re going to learn how the tradition of singing Auld Lang Syne on New Year’s Eve got started and who originally composed the song in the first place. [TRANSCRIPT] Don’t miss

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What are Blue Laws?

What are Blue Laws?

Melissa December 29, 2014 2

Jen asks: What are “Blue Laws” and how did they come to be? Rooted in the basic Christian tenet that Sunday is to be reserved as “the Lord’s day,” blue laws were originally enacted

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The Man on the Raft: The Story of Poon Lim

The Man on the Raft: The Story of Poon Lim

Matt Blitz December 26, 2014 2

On the morning of April 5, 1943, about ten miles off the coast of Brazil, a fishing family in their small boat spotted a Chinese man on a much smaller wooden raft bobbing up

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Christmas Facts Wrap

Christmas Facts Wrap

Daven Hiskey December 24, 2014 0

Krampus, the Christmas Demon Santa Claus has long been the symbol of Christmas, bringing joy and presents to all the good girls and boys. But if you are child in Germany, Austria, and other

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The First Person to Use the Temporary Insanity Defense was a Congressman Who Murdered the Son of the Composer of “The Star Spangled Banner”

The First Person to Use the Temporary Insanity Defense was a Congressman Who Murdered the Son of the Composer of “The Star Spangled Banner”

Eddie Deezen December 23, 2014 0

You might think the temporary insanity defense was a relatively new thing.  I mean, maybe it began in the 1940s or possibly the ’30s.  What with all the psychobabble around in those times.  But,

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When Art was an Olympic Sport

When Art was an Olympic Sport

Matt Blitz December 22, 2014 3

When Baron Pierre de Coubertin founded the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1894, he declared that one of the missions of the modern Olympiad would be “to reunite in the bonds of legitimate wedlock

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