Tag Archives: quick facts

1/6th of the Time Spent Filming Alfred Hitchcock’s Movie Psycho was Spent Shooting the Shower Scene

Text Version: In Alfred Hitchcock’s movie, Psycho, the shower scene was made up from 90 different shots using 70 different camera angles. The entire movie only took six weeks to shoot, however, that one shower scene took just over 1 week to complete.  It was believed that Hitchcock used cold water in the shower to make Janet Leigh scream seem more […]

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The First ‘Tube’ of Toothpaste was Invented By Dr. Sheffield, called Crème Dentifrice

Text Version: Before toothpaste as we know it today, people tried several different things to clean their teeth. To name a few, egg shells, ash, ground oyster shells, and salt. It wasn’t until 1824, when American dentist named Peabody started adding soap to his paste that things started to change.  John Harris in the 1850’s then added chalk, and in […]

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The Russian Olympic Team Arrived 12 Days Late to The 1908 London Olympics Because They Hadn’t Updated to Using the Gregorian Calendar

Text Version: In the 1500’s most Roman Catholic countries & Scotland adopted the Gregorian Calendar (established by Pope Gregory XIII to compensate for the errors in time that had built up over centuries) over the Julian Calendar (introduced by Julius Caesar in 45 BC) . A lot of protestant countries however, ignored this new calendar for another 200 or so […]

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Chewing on The Bark of White Willow Tree Alleviates Fever and Pain

Text Version: Before aspirin was introduced, people would chew on the bark of the white willow tree to reduce fever and inflammation. White willow contains salicin, a chemical similar to acetylsalicylic acid  found in today’s aspirin. In fact, in the early 1800s salicin was used to make Aspirin. The tree has anti-inflammatory effects and although it may be slower acting, the effects […]

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Cheerleading Started As An All-Male Activity

  Text Version: Organized cheerleading started as an all-male activity. On the 2nd of November 1898, student Johnny Campbell of the University of Minnesota, directed a crowd at a football game into cheering “Rah, Rah, Rah! Ski-u-mah, Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! Varsity! Varsity! Varsity, Minn-e-So-Tah!”, making Campbell the very first cheerleader. From then, the University of Minnesota organized a “yell leader” squad […]

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Listerine Popularized the Phrase “Always a Bridesmaid, Never a Bride”

Text Version: The phrase “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride” first originated in a music tune by Fred W. Leigh which had a line in it stating, “Why Am I Always A Bridesmaid?”. However, the mouthwash brand Listerine is responsible for the phrase’s widespread popularity. In 1924, Listerine launched a series of advertisements with slogan “Often a bridesmaid, never a […]

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Some Confederate Newspapers During The Civil War were Printed On Wallpaper

Text Version: During the American Civil War, the Union soldiers blocked supplies to the Confederacy. Due to this there were mass shortages and the newspaper offices ran out of paper. The scarcity of paper forced editors into being resourceful and to find other means of publishing, which they did. They used wallpaper to print their newspapers (this was not ripped […]

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Black Pepper Was So Expensive In Ancient Times, It Was Used As Currency

Text Version: Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is commonly dried and used as a spice the world over. In earlier times, although pepper was widely well-known as a seasoning, it was very costly which only the affluent could afford. In fact, the Dutch even today use the expression “peperduur” in their language, meaning ‘pepper expensive’ for  something that is very expensive. […]

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From 1940 to 2008 There Were 157 People Who Fell Out of a Plane During a Crash Without a Parachute and Lived

According to the Geneva-based Aircraft Crashes Record Office, between 1940 and 2008 there were 157 people who fell out of planes during a crash and without a parachute and lived to tell about it. A full 42 of those falls occurred at heights over 10,000 feet! One such incident involved a British Tail-gunner whose plane was shot down in 1944 […]

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“A Chatty Little Handbook for All Women” was the First Known Instance of Someone Suggesting Rear View Mirrors for Cars

The book “The Woman and the Car, A Chatty Little Handbook for All Women Who Motor or Who Want to Motor” (presumably extremely chatty, given the title), by Dorothy Levitt written in 1906, recommended that women carry a hand-mirror while driving as it is convenient to be able to see behind you during traffic by holding the hand mirror up.  […]

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Sirius-A is the Brightest Extrasolar Star Visible to the Naked Eye from Earth

Sirius-A is the brightest extrasolar star visible to the naked eye from Earth, being almost twice as bright as the second brightest, Canopus.  Sirius-A and Sirius-B combine to form a binary system and appear as one star to the naked eye, though the vast majority of luminosity to the naked eye comes from Sirius-A, Sirius-B being a white dwarf which […]

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How Trees Make Food for Themselves

Leaves are the food processing factories for trees.  The plants use their roots to take in water and other essential nutrients.  The leaves then use the water and carbon dioxide from the air, in combination with sunlight, to turn the water and carbon dioxide into glucose, also giving off the byproduct oxygen in the process.  It then uses the glucose […]

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The “Fish and Chips” Combo Originated in Britain Around the Mid-19th Century

The now common “Fish and Chips” combo originated in Britain around 1860.  For nearly 200 years before that, fish vendors had been serving fried fish on the streets of Britain.  Sometime around the mid-19th century, one of them got the bright idea to serve thick cut French fries with the fried fish, with the first known “Fish and Chip” eatery […]

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