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From Desert to Party Central: The Birth of Las Vegas

From Desert to Party Central: The Birth of Las Vegas

Matt Blitz July 3, 2014 0

For thousands of years, Mohave tribes dotted the land in and around what is now the modern-day city of Las Vegas. Sometime in the 1770s, Spanish missionary Francisco Gracias became the first foreigner to

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The Origin of the QWERTY Keyboard

The Origin of the QWERTY Keyboard

Samantha July 2, 2014 0

Today I found out the origin of the QWERTY keyboard.The first typewriter was introduced to the United States in 1868 by Christopher Latham Sholes. His first attempt to build a typing device consisted of

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The Men Who Walked on the Moon

The Men Who Walked on the Moon

Melissa July 1, 2014 4

Marcus L. asks: How many people walked on the moon? Who were they? Forty-five years ago this month, a human being first set foot on the moon. Despite four and a half decades and

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Why Does Rhode Island Have “Island” in the Name When It is Not One?

Why Does Rhode Island Have “Island” in the Name When It is Not One?

Matt Blitz June 20, 2014 2

Aaron asks: Why is Rhode Island called an island when it is not? Most think the history of Rhode Island starts with Roger Williams, but the state’s “discovery” (at least by Europeans) dates back

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Why Graduates Wear Caps and Gowns

Why Graduates Wear Caps and Gowns

Kathy Padden June 19, 2014 6

Karla asks: Why do graduates wear caps and gowns? Also, why do we throw our caps in the air when we graduate? Inquiring minds want to know!!! Wearing academic robes is a tradition that

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Glowing in the Dark, The “Radium Girls”

Glowing in the Dark, The “Radium Girls”

Daven Hiskey June 12, 2014 6

On December 21, 1898, Marie and Pierre Curie discovered the radioactive element radium (in the form of radium chloride), extracting it from uraninite. They first removed the uranium from the uraninite sample and then

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Hobbs and His Lock Picks: The Great Lock Controversy of 1851

Hobbs and His Lock Picks: The Great Lock Controversy of 1851

Matt Blitz June 9, 2014 10

In April 1851, Alfred C. Hobbs boarded the steamship Washington bound for Southampton, England. His official duty was to sell the New York City-based company Day and Newell’s newest product – the parautopic lock

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The Largely Forgotten Los Angeles’ Chinese Massacre

The Largely Forgotten Los Angeles’ Chinese Massacre

Melissa June 6, 2014 2

On a cool October night in 1871, 18 Chinese men and boys were massacred by a bloodthirsty mob in Los Angeles. The Cause Debate continues over the actual trigger for the riot, but most

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A Brief Look at the Werewolf Through History

A Brief Look at the Werewolf Through History

Kathy Padden May 30, 2014 1

Since ancient times, the fusion of man and wolf has been the stuff of legend and folklore (“wer” was the word for “man” in old English, with “man” being completely gender neutral). Virtually every

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The King’s Law – The Code of Hammurabi

The King’s Law – The Code of Hammurabi

Theodoros II May 29, 2014 2

Hammurabi was the oldest son of Sin-Muballit, and he became the sixth king of Babylon upon his father’s abdication around 1729 BC (based on the short chronology timeline). Even though he didn’t inherit much

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The Slave Who Helped Assemble the Famous “Freedom Statue” in Washington D.C.

The Slave Who Helped Assemble the Famous “Freedom Statue” in Washington D.C.

Karl Smallwood May 29, 2014 2

The Statue of Freedom sitting atop the dome of the U.S. Capitol building in Washing D.C. has more alternate names than the obscure half of the Wu Tang Clan. Over the years, the names

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How One Man’s Attempt to Create the Philosopher’s Stone Out of Human Urine Led to the First Element Discovered Since Ancient Times

How One Man’s Attempt to Create the Philosopher’s Stone Out of Human Urine Led to the First Element Discovered Since Ancient Times

Matt Blitz May 28, 2014 5

Phosphorus is an essential element for life. Forms of it are found in DNA, RNA, and all living cell membranes. It is the sixth most abundant element in any living organism. Phosphorus can also

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The Mountain Meadows Massacre of 1857

The Mountain Meadows Massacre of 1857

Emily Upton May 26, 2014 0

On September 11, 1857, the Baker-Fancher emigrant wagon train was rolling through Mountain Meadows, Utah, about 35 miles southwest of Cedar City. The train was made up of several smaller parties that joined together

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The Sacred Band of Thebes Entirely Made Up of Male Lovers

The Sacred Band of Thebes Entirely Made Up of Male Lovers

Melissa May 13, 2014 2

In the 4th century B.C., for a period of 50 years a small force of 300 elite Theban soldiers dominated Grecian battlefields. What makes this band of brothers unique in history is that it

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The Goingsnake Shootout

The Goingsnake Shootout

Emily Upton May 12, 2014 1

Ezekiel Proctor was a 19th century Cherokee man who had walked the Trail of Tears from Georgia to the Indian Territory when he was just seven years old. He was proud of his heritage,

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WWII Files: Japan’s Secret Weapon- Exploding Balloons

WWII Files: Japan’s Secret Weapon- Exploding Balloons

Staci Lehman May 12, 2014 1

WWII saw the development of some zany designs for weapons, such as when the U.S. developed pigeon guided missiles and (literal) bat bombs (the latter of which were a little too effective, accidentally destroying the testing

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The Lawrence Massacre of 1863

The Lawrence Massacre of 1863

Emily Upton May 9, 2014 0

Kansas had been swept up in the debate over whether or not it should allow slavery for some time. When it was finally decided that Kansas would be a free state, the South was

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The Jackson State Massacre of 1970

The Jackson State Massacre of 1970

Melissa May 7, 2014 1

Overshadowed by the coverage of the Kent State Massacre that occurred not two weeks prior, when two people were killed and 11 injured while protesting at Jackson State College in the spring of 1970,

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