History »

The Largely Forgotten Paris Massacre of 1961

The Largely Forgotten Paris Massacre of 1961

Emily Upton December 30, 2013 0

France and Algeria have a long, disgruntled history with each other. The first major contact was made between the two countries in 1526. At the time, Algeria was still part of the Ottoman Empire.Various

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Why We Sing “Auld Lang Syne” on New Year’s Eve

Why We Sing “Auld Lang Syne” on New Year’s Eve

Daven Hiskey December 30, 2013 5

This is an excerpt from our book, The Wise Book of Whys, available on Kindle | Nook and in Print | Audiobook This tradition is mostly thanks to Guy Lombardo and the Royal Canadian

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The First U.S. Presidential Assassination Attempt

The First U.S. Presidential Assassination Attempt

Eddie Deezen December 27, 2013 0

There have been four assassinations of U.S. Presidents to date. Two are very famous and two not as well-known. The first assassination of a President is both well-known and well-documented. On April 14, 1865,

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The Articles of Confederation: The Constitution Before the Constitution

The Articles of Confederation: The Constitution Before the Constitution

Matt Blitz December 24, 2013 1

For four hot, humid July days, 56 delegates of the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia with one purpose – to ratify the Declaration of Independence. The document, originally drafted by Thomas Jefferson with

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The Domino Theory and its many uses throughout the years

The Domino Theory and its many uses throughout the years

Theodoros II December 23, 2013 3

When younger generations hear the word ‘dominoes,’ they usually associate it with the famous board game, while others–especially food lovers–might connect it with a delicious pizza. For those who are more politically aware, the

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The Amazing Acoustics of the Epidaurus Theatre

The Amazing Acoustics of the Epidaurus Theatre

Emily Upton December 17, 2013 0

Today I Found Out about the amazing acoustics of the ancient Epidaurus Theatre. Epidaurus, Greece was a small, unassuming city in ancient times, best known for being the supposed birth place of Apollo’s son,

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The Orangeburg Massacre of 1968

The Orangeburg Massacre of 1968

Emily Upton December 17, 2013 0

Today I Found Out about the Orangeburg Massacre of 1968. As with many massacres around this turbulent time in history, the Orangeburg Massacre had its beginnings in race relations. In February, 1968, black students

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Where Did The Time Go: The Phantom Time Hypothesis

Where Did The Time Go: The Phantom Time Hypothesis

Matt Blitz December 16, 2013 1

Everyone has had a moment in their life where they’ve muttered to themselves, “Wow, where did the time go?” It may have been after a wild night of partying, or a great conversation with

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The St. Francis Dam Disaster

The St. Francis Dam Disaster

Matt Blitz December 12, 2013 0

On March 12, 1928 at approximately 11:57 pm, the St. Francis Dam broke. 12.4 billion gallons of water that was supposed to fill the sinks, bathtubs, and mouths of Los Angeles residents was now

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Why We “Drop” the Ball on New Year’s Eve

Why We “Drop” the Ball on New Year’s Eve

Matt Blitz December 12, 2013 7

Jeremy asks: Why do we drop the ball on New Year’s eve in Times Square? When Adolph Ochs purchased the floundering New York Times in 1896, he made it his mission to make the

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The Story of the U.S. National Anthem and How It Became Part of the National Pastime

The Story of the U.S. National Anthem and How It Became Part of the National Pastime

Matt Blitz December 10, 2013 0

As Francis Scott Key sat aboard a ship, now officially a prisoner of war, he could only watch as the British bombarded American forces at Fort McHenry.  He had been sent to the British

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The Fascinating Origin of Arlington National Cemetery

The Fascinating Origin of Arlington National Cemetery

Melissa December 9, 2013 2

The final resting place of presidents, bandleaders, war heroes, astronauts, inventors, civil rights leaders, Pulitzer Prize winners, boxers, Supreme Court justices and sports stars, Arlington National Cemetery stands as a memorial to the melting

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The Bloody Battle of Matewan

The Bloody Battle of Matewan

Emily Upton December 5, 2013 0

Today I Found Out about the Battle of Matewan, also known as the Matewan Massacre. Matewan is a small town in West Virginia located on the Tug River which serves as the dividing line

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WWII Files: Pigeon-Guided Missiles and Bat Bombs

WWII Files: Pigeon-Guided Missiles and Bat Bombs

Staci Lehman December 4, 2013 1

Today I Found Out about Project Pigeon and Project X-Ray, WWII plans to use pigeons to guide missiles and (literal) bat bombers. The man behind Project Pigeon was famed American behaviorist and Harvard professor

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The Midnight Massacre (1945)

The Midnight Massacre (1945)

Melissa December 3, 2013 0

On July 8, 1945, two months to the day after the Allies declared victory in Europe, 29 German POWs were shot while peacefully residing in a prison camp in Salina, Utah. The Shooter Private

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The Exploding Anti-Tank Dogs of World War II

The Exploding Anti-Tank Dogs of World War II

Emily Upton December 2, 2013 4

Today I Found Out about the use of exploding anti-tank dogs during World War II. These dogs, usually Alsatians, were also called “Hundminen” or “dog mines.” They were  trained to carry explosives on their

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The Resurrectionists and the Doctors’ Mob Riot

The Resurrectionists and the Doctors’ Mob Riot

Melissa November 26, 2013 1

Since long before colonoscopies, mammograms and physicals (turn your head and cough), patients have had a love-hate relationship with doctors. Often uncomfortable (or downright awful), the procedures employed by physicians are frequently met with

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The Colfax Massacre of 1873

The Colfax Massacre of 1873

Emily Upton November 25, 2013 0

In the early days of the United States, cotton and tobacco crops on the east coast are remembered as big contributors to the ongoing slave trade. Meanwhile, the sugar cane plantations in Louisiana are

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